All posts tagged Mitt Romney


The Elephant in the Room

( This is part 1 of 2 of this article. To read the second part “Prescriptions for an Ailing Elephant” go here)

There is an elephant in the room. Look in the mirror, Republicans: It’s you. There is no one to blame but yourselves, and it’s time to get your act together. This past election made it clear: President Obama and the Democrats did not defeat you, you have been defeating yourselves for the past twenty years. This past election was a culmination of a ruinous policy, and trajectory, that is of your own making. The primary purpose of a political party, or any organization, is to achieve their policy, and in order to do so you must win. The goals of the Tea Party and the religious super-right are sacrificing electoral success for ideological purity. That is the surest formula for self-defeat and the GOP has mastered that formula. Dogma does not win elections, and as long as you choose to be a political party rather than an ideological movement, your goal is to win elections. Having a candidate who shares most but not all of your ideals is better than not having a candidate win at all. Somehow, somewhere, the party has forgotten this fundamental principle.

 

Lets highlight the losses that Republicans have inflicted upon themselves, both in the 2010 mid-term election, and in this year’s election. Read more…


It’s NOT the Economy, Stupid

 

It’s demographics.

The Republicans would like to make every excuse possible to explain the drugging they received in last week’s election. The excuses have varied from ‘Mitt Romney was not a stellar candidate,’ to the president and his campaign painted the Republicans as out of touch (which they are), as well as every other possible excuse except the simple numbers of it. This was not an election of ideas, popularity, or the economy, as the Romney campaign would have had us believe. Or anything else. Plain and simple, it was demographics.

The Republicans have been governing over an ever increasingly shrinking coalition since the 1990’s and it finally took this election to make them realize it. Based on some delusional hypothesis from conservative pundits and analysts, the GOP thought it was going to win the presidency and perhaps re-take the senate. This is wishful thinking at best.  In this article by Chris Cillizza, of The Washington Post’s TheFix, he argues

The numbers paint a very clear picture: Republicans now face the same low electoral-college ceiling that Democrats confronted for much of the 1970s and 1980s — needing everything to go right to win the presidency, much less break the 300-electoral-vote barrier. Read more…


Four More Years, of the Status Quo?

First and foremost, congratulations to President Barack Obama on winning re-election yesterday and on a well run, and tremendously successful, campaign.

Despite all the punditry and right-wing news and media projections it was not as close as anyone had expected. The Obama campaign was well organized  thanks to the incredible work of David Plouffe, David Axelrod, and Jim Messina, who I believe will go down as the best campaign organization in the modern era. Their ability to turn out the vote using all methods of traditional media and modern technology, along with a strong grassroots political machine, ensured a decisive and quick win for the president. Read more…


Country First, Candidates Second

Today  is election day. Both parties and presidential candidates have been campaigning for months and it will finally culminate today. Regardless of who wins this years election, it is set to be the most divisive in American history. If Barack Obama wins, he will do so with the lowest percentage of white voters in history and if Mitt Romney wins he will do it with the least amount of non-whites ever recorded. This just illustrates one of the numerous ways this election is being decided through a divided prism of opposing voters such as: whites and non-whites, married women and single women, pro-life and pro-choice, tax cutters and revenue raisers, those worried about the debt and deficit and those not, small-government and big-government believers, pro-Obamacare and anti-Obamacare, pro-gay marriage and anti-gay marriage, pro-gun control and anti-gun control, and the list goes on dividing us up…

However, despite all the negativity and constant rhetoric, we are fortunate to have two well-qualified and dignified men running for the highest office in the county. Though they may not be many peoples first choice, and there are many more qualified people, our political process has nominated and chosen these two men and that choice is a blessing in and of itself. Today, the United States continues its growth and living history by adding a new chapter and a new leader. What we should hope for is true leadership not just from the winner, but from the loser as well. Read more…


Obama Vs. Romney…according to the world

With all the endless campaigning and non0stop partisanship going on ahead of Tuesdays election it would be nice to take a step away, like internationally, and see what the world has to say about the upcoming presidential election. Fortunately, Foreign Policy did just that in this article. By taking numerous world polls we see that the world is not as divided about the election as we may be here at home. As you can tell from the map above, the world seems to be pretty blue.

Obama is preferred over Mitt Romney in 31 out of 32 countries in the UPI poll and 20 out of 21 countries in another BBC World Service/GlobeScan/PIPA survey. Fifty-one percent of respondents in the UPI poll said they would cast a ballot for Obama, with more people saying they wouldn’t vote for either candidate (18 percent) than would vote for the Republican nominee (12 percent). In the BBC survey, 50 percent of respondents chose Obama and only 9 percent selected Romney.

Perhaps the administration’s goal to reshape America’s image around the world may have worked, either that or like our elections, this has become a global popularity contest. But what was striking, truly striking was though many nations complain about America’s role in the world and many people tend to criticize us, they seem to be keenly involved in our affairs and care about the outcome. Take for example; Read more…


Spoils of Victory

Whether President Obama or Governor Romney win the election net week, one thing is pretty certain ( though no really wants to admit it), whoever wins will preside over an economic boom in the US. Fareed Zakaria makes a compelling argument in his latest article in the Washington Post. According to the most recent International Monetary Fund’s World Economic Outlook;

when looking out over the next four years — the next presidential term — the IMF projects that the United States will be the strongest of the world’s rich economies. U.S. growth is forecast to average 3 percent, much stronger than that of Germany or France (1.2 percent) or even Canada (2.3 percent). Increasingly, the evidence suggests that the United States has come out of the financial crisis of 2008 in better shape than its peers — because of the actions of its government.

Despite Mitt Romney’s argument to the contrary, or that we could be doing “better” than  we are now, other leading economists have echoed the positive trends that are being illustrate by the economy. Read more…


Debating the Debate (Part 3)

The BEST assessments and recap on last nights debate. Considering it was on foreign policy, The Economist covers all the issues well and gives great insight.


Finally, a Two Person Debate

If you need a debate recap to tell you that President Obama beat Mitt Romney this past Tuesday you need to take a couple lessons in debating. Obama made strong points, looked in control and comfortable, whereas Governor Romney was aggressive, tried too many gotcha moments, and instead of enjoying his past performance and building on it reached too far. Read more…


Debating the Debate ( Part 2)

Tom Brokaw and David Gregory, the moderator of Meet The Press, join the Morning Joe panel to discuss the debate.

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy


Conspiring Against Civility

“If voters come to mistrust the most basic functions of government, the resulting cynicism can destroy the basic compact of citizenship.”

A great editorial by the NYT. It can be ok to question government, to debate policies and to disagree. However, what has plagued this country and both political parties is a continual erosion of the foundations and legitimacy of the institutions of government. When people no longer trust the presidency, congress, the courts, or our bureaucracies with doing their basic duties without total and complete cynicism, a serious fracture begins to arise in the basic tenets of a society.

I am all for debate and discussion, but there needs to be a civility. You can only attack something for so long before ruining it and destroying it, and unfortunately when you do that with social and political institutions the damage could be irreversible.